I’m A Happy Hippy, Part 2

Part 2 – Post-op – Day 2

After a night of basically no sleep, I “woke up” to experience my first attempt to get out of bed. Wowzers, was that ever a challenge!!! I don’t have a ton of strength in my arms, but in order to get in and out of bed, you need to use them for balance, and strength and pushing, etc.  The nurses were all fantastic at helping if I wanted it, but I’m also so stubborn, I want to do everything myself.

So, using the instructions of the nurse, I was able to sit on the edge of the bed and “dangle”. That’s what they call it – dangling – and it’s important to do that first, to make sure you’re not dizzy and aren’t going to collapse on the floor when you stand for the first time. After I assured them I was okay, they helped me put my Crocs on – easy footwear to slip on and off – and then using my walker, I stood slowly for the first time. I won’t say it was painful, but it felt really weird – maybe because the motion was smoother, since everything fits together properly now. Most of the pain was in the upper thigh and groin area, not the hip, so that was a bit strange. At any rate…I was standing…and all this effort so I could use the portable commode beside my bed, instead of a bedpan!!!  Yes, that’s what this was all about – peeing!

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Relief and laughing!! I did it!

Of course, once you get out of bed, you have to get back into it again. And that too has challenges…because of the 90º restriction, you can’t just bend and twist as you might normally. In this case, you have to back up to the bed, and then using your arms and good leg, swivel yourself into the bed and then scootching over bit by bit. It’s exhausting!!!

And you’ve already seen this one, but yes…it’s the same kind of relief every time you successfully get into bed!

AllTuckedInAgain!

During this day, I was up for most of my meals, instead of having them in bed. Sitting in a chair is basically the same procedure in that you back up to the chair, then put your operated leg out while using the arms of the chair to help you ease down into the seat. It’s tricky at first, but I got the hang of it quickly, and found it much nicer than just laying in bed. It made eating a lot easier too, having the tray right there in front of me.

Almost...Almost!  MookieWatchingMeLaugh

The rest of that day was pretty basic, with the exception of having the Physical Therapy aide come to teach me some movements to encourage healing. I was told I would be able to go home the next day, and I was soooo happy! It’s nice to be taken care of in the hospital (and I was cared for VERY well!), but there’s truly “no place like home”!  And after another night of little sleep, that’s exactly where I went…home, to my hubby and my cat Dorie and my own bed!!!

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Dorie keeping my chair warm at home!

And as promised, I was released the next morning. I managed to get into the car without too much pain, but was relieved to be home. I spent the majority of the first week home sleeping in bed, or resting in my chair. I had purchased a cryotherapy unit for icing the hip to keep the swelling down, so Ray was in charge of getting that set up for me each time – adding the ice and water, etc.  If you ever need ice therapy for an extended time, I HIGHLY recommend using a machine like this…so much better than ice bags or bags of veggies from your freezer!!

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Getting ready to shower…this is after taking the bandage off for the first time. The circular impressions are from the bandage itself. Look at how beautiful that incision is…my scar is going to be almost invisible! Great work!

Over the last couple of months (March and April), I’ve made a great recovery. I’ve had one x-ray, just prior to seeing Dr. Burnett for my first post-surgical visit, and everything seems to be settling in well. I had the staples removed at that point as well – all 53 of them! Everything is healing beautifully and the scar is so thin, it’s going to fade into nothingness with no problems at all. Dr. Burnett truly did a masterpiece of work when he put me back together!!

I’ve been to Physiotherapy twice now to learn exercises to do at home between appointments (every three weeks). These are standard exercises, like the attached (this one is from my second Physio session), but wow, is it ever hard work in the beginning!!!

Physio

The only thing I’ve noticed is that I still have a lot of pain in the upper thigh/groin area and just recently, I’ve noticed that my new hip is “popping” when I walk. I’m sure it’s just everything settling into place, and with regards to the thigh and groin…when you consider muscles were cut and moved to accommodate inserting the new hip, things ARE going to feel weird/painful for some time. I do have a bit of a leg length discrepancy…the operated leg feels a tiny bit longer than my left leg, but again…that’s something that could take up to a year to finish healing properly.

The only other “issue” I’ve had with this surgery is the fact that my right knee is also/still a problem. I’ve been wearing a brace during waking hours, but without it, I’ve had frequent incidents where my knee will suddenly “collapse” from under me, with a huge bolt of pain shooting through. I’ve had it x-rayed and the results are osteoarthritis with a “loose body”, but so far, the doctors at Rebalance haven’t felt like there needs to be anything done, other that wearing the brace. I’ve noticed though that even when the brace is on, I can sometimes still feel that collapsing feeling and mildly, that bolt of pain. When I walk, whether with crutches, a cane or without any aid, my gait feels different. I’ll be discussing this during my next visit with Dr. Burnett, which happens in early May.

So…if I had to do this all over, would I?  Absolutely!!!  For the first time in I can’t remember how long, I no longer have the feeling that my hips are being crushed between a vise. Sure, there is still some pain and discomfort, but it’s NOTHING like what I felt before. I’m hoping I can actually decrease the dosage of my OxyNeo Slow Release oxycontin med for pain relief – there’s been that much of a reduction in my overall pain levels. I do still have the pain from my various other problems, but having this hip replaced has helped to diminish a huge part of the pain equation. I’d do surgery again in a heartbeat to get this relief!!

Thanks for following this part of my journey. I will be continuing to blog about life in general as well as the other medical issues I live with, as a source of information and encouragement for others.

So what IS happening in my life, beyond hip surgery??  Well, let’s see…