I’m A Happy Hippy, Part 2

Part 2 – Post-op

If you haven’t read Part 1, you probably should. It will help familiarize yourself with what’s happening as we move towards Post-op. Go ahead…I’ll wait.

< insert Jeopardy music here>

Welcome back and here we go!

I know that the surgery itself went very well, but I really was quite sedated for most of it. I did wake at one point, maybe when they were positioning me, and I could hear some hammering and a couple of voices talking, but it wasn’t disturbing or upsetting. I remember looking at the Anesthesiologist and sort of smiling at him, like “oh, hi there!”, but before I had time to realize that was my new implant Dr. Burnett was hammering into my leg, I was drifting off to sleep again. That spinal anesthesia/IV Sedation really was quite lovely and I think if I ever have surgery again and it’s an option, I will most definitely take it!!!!

The next thing I remember was a bunch of people moving me onto a bed, and then being rolled into a new room – so the transfer from the Operating Room to the Recovery Room. Because I hadn’t had the General Sedation, I was quite awake once the Anesthesiologist gave me medication to reverse the effects of the sedation I had received in the Operating Room. Again, I wish I’d had my glasses because I would have felt even more like “me”, but I understand the issues with potential loss, etc.  My nurse was excellent in regards to pain control and making sure I wasn’t trying to tough it out. Because of my Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain, I’m already taking long acting Opioid medication and was able to follow my usual drug scheduling leading up to surgery. I am sensitive to Morphine as I find it makes me quite itchy and “jumpy” and I also get very nauseous, which is a problem for me (have I mentioned earlier that I am unable to physically vomit due to a previous stomach surgery? If I am that sick where I am retching and dry heaving, etc. I end up having to go to the E.R. to get a Nasogastric tube shoved down my nose into my stomach to get rid of whatever’s in there, so there’s nothing to puke up. Sorry…that was probably too much information).

Anyway, Fentanyl is typically ordered for me in hospital so that’s what I was given and it worked really well. That plus the fact I couldn’t feel my legs (“you ain’t got no damn legs!”) really did make the time in the Recovery Room go quite comfortably. My nurse would check me frequently to see if I could feel my toes or my knees, etc. and I was finally starting to get sensation back in the left leg after an hour, and then in the right leg about another hour later. I know that the right leg, the operated leg, was more heavily frozen and took twice as long to finally regain all feeling again. It was the weirdest thing, to stare at my toes and try wiggling them, and not be able to do a thing. It gave me an appreciation for what paralyzed people might go through, and how the tiniest movement is so joyful when it happens!

I would like to showcase the latest in legwear – the flattering compression leggings and pumping circulation wraps to prevent blood clots!!! Take a look at this and then the picture beside it shows you why. Don’t look at my tushy (blush blush!) ha ha ha!!!

AllTuckedInAgain!  GREATIncision!!

Blood clots are a major concern after any surgery, but after certain surgeries in particular, total hip replacement being one of them. I wore these leg pumps for the entire time I was in bed, only taking them off to use the bathroom and to walk. Once I was back in bed, on they went. I am on blood thinners for a specific period of time as well.

Regarding the second picture, you can see my surgeon’s initials at the top. There are 53 staples in there and I think the incision is approximately 9 or 10 inches long. It’s absolutely straight and clean and will heal up beautifully!!! No wonder Dr. Burnett is the best!!! To get a better idea of where it’s located, I am laying on my left side, and the incision is on my right hip. The top of the incision is on the left of the picture and if you count off the spaces between the pen markings, my hip bone is between 4 & 5, almost right under the initials.

When I had regained a good portion of feeling back, I was finally moved from Recovery to my room in the South wing of the hospital. I had a private room – not that I had requested one, but apparently 80% of the rooms are private, which in my opinion is quite lovely. I don’t mind a roommate, but I really prefer my solitude, especially because I don’t sleep and I’m up at all hours. I would feel guilty if I disturbed anyone. I’m also fortunate to have Insurance coverage for this too.

Resting

The nurses kept me on oxygen the entire time I was there. I had planned on using my CPAP machine, but because I really don’t sleep much in the hospital, I had Ray take it home and just stayed on the oxygen. Here I’m just resting after getting all settled into my room. I’m waiting for Ray to get here…oh, and look. Here he is!!!

AfterSurgery

And yes, I finally have my glasses back too!!! All the better to see my fantastic husband. How I love this man…he takes such good care of me. I only just noticed after adding this picture how close I came to giving you a peep show with my gown slipping. Geez…you already got to see my tushy…I think those drugs really did a number on me. Time for some sleep me thinks!!! Actually, what I really wanted was food. I was so hungry at this point (I’m guessing this photo was taken around 7 or 8 pm?) but my Nurse Lisa told me that if I ate, I’d probably just get sick and throw it up (aka, get the dreaded NG tube!!) even if I didn’t have a General Anesthetic. I still had drugs in my system and she’s seen it happen enough. I did get some tea finally and then at around 11pm, Lisa showed up with this:

FinallySomeFoodNearMidnight

Yes, that was a roast beef sandwich on white bread with butter than I inhaled plus crackers and cheese!!!!  I ate the first half of the sandwich so fast before thinking “oh, I should take a picture for the blog”. Ha ha! It really was the best thing I’d eaten in a long time. Finally, I felt tired enough to try and sleep, so we did one fun go-round with the bedpan (there was no way I was ready to try and get out of bed yet, nor did they really want me to) and then off to the Land of Nod.

Thus ended Day 1. I shall continue the adventure again tomorrow!!!

I’m A Happy Hippy, Part 1

I am the proud owner of a new hip, and she’s wonderful!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

First off, let me apologize for the huge delay in posting the follow up to my surgery on Feb. 7th. I should have know that a major surgery like this would cause me to be quite fatigued for a while, but I didn’t realize quite how tired I’d be! That being said, the surgery was a complete success and I couldn’t be happier with how things went!!! I’m going to break this up into three parts – Pre-Op, Post-Op and Home Again. So…here we go!!

PRE-OP

I was up at 4am on Feb. 7th, so I could have my second shower with my super scrubbing brush and get all the last minute stuff done before we left for the hospital. We live in Langford which is a small city just outside of Victoria – normally about a 30 minute drive in good weather without rush hour traffic. Unfortunately, good weather is NOT what we’ve been having over the last few months – this is what Ray found and dealt with:

SnowBigDeal  ICanSeeClearlyNow

Thankfully, the roads themselves were pretty decent, even for that early in the morning and we arrived at the Royal Jubilee Hospital at approximately 5:30am – half an hour earlier than our scheduled time. There’s a Tim Horton’s coffee shop right beside Admitting so Ray grabbed a coffee, and then we sat in front of Admitting until they opened. We chatted quietly, and then suddenly, we were being met by the greeting committee of one – Georgie:

Georgie2

Now, Georgie is a handsome boy who lives across the street from the Royal Jubilee Hospital. His frustrated parents have given up on trying to stop him from coming over here – he’s an indoor/outdoor cat and when he’s outdoors, he treks over here to visit, supervise, observe and greet. He’s polite and friendly, but very busy and he doesn’t always have time to spend with you – there’s much to be done for this busy boy. Once the metal security gate around the Admitting Desk is open, he trots in behind there to the offices where he’s greeted and loved up and then gets on with his day. Ray and I were so surprised to see him, especially thinking the Hospital would take issue with it, but Georgie seems to have proven himself to be quite the character, and most people who are greeted by him seem to calm down, feel less stress and anxiety and be more talkative, instead of pulling into their shells because of fear. So…it’s a good relationship for everyone!

Alright…so after getting all the paperwork done, confirming I had in fact paid for my new hip, and receiving my hospital bracelet, Ray and I headed to the 3rd Floor to Day Surgery, where all surgical patients start out. It’s only after your surgery that you’re separated after recovery – either back to Day Surgery if you’re going home that day, or to your Floor if you’re staying as an In Patient. As one of the first people booked for surgery that morning, it was fairly quiet when we got to 3rd and the nurses were just opening the doors. I was directed to a change room with a bag for my clothes, and given in return two gowns (one to wear open at the back, one to use as a housecoat) a pair of booties and a hat. Ray took my stuff and then it was time to say goodbye. He had to leave for a meeting involving a volunteer program he was involved in at the hospital regarding prostate examinations, and I would be going through the lengthy check-in process with my nurse Amanda. We had a quick hug and kiss, he took my glasses as well as my clothes (I WISH there was a way to keep the glasses!!!) and away we both went.

Amanda got me tucked into bed, brought me one of those wonderful warm blankets and then we went through my health history. I asked her who would be starting the IV and she said probably her, so I told her about my crappy veins. I suggested we might want to put some heat on my arm now to try and plump them up and she agreed, so we got that started, then continued with the questions. We talked about previous surgeries, outcomes, all my various health conditions, medications, all the various tests I’ve had done, my Diabetes and blood testing, plus my Insulin usage…you name it, we discussed it. Then she went and grabbed the IV kit and we got going on that. I’ll give her tons of credit…she listened to me when I described my veins and what they would probably do – how they would act and react and what she could and couldn’t do if she didn’t get a stick the first time. And because she listened to me, she got that big bore needle in my arm the very first time, with only a small amount of having to probe around for the vein. She said after, she’s learned to listen to people because we know our bodies. We know what will happen and we’re right, so as a nurse, why should she pretend to know more than us? She was an excellent nurse…just the right amount of professionalism and personality!!

Once all this was done, there was nothing to do except rest, until it was time to be moved over to the Pre-op area. Dr. Burnett came in to say hi, and to initial the hip, making sure it was the correct side that we were operating on, and then before I knew it, I was being moved over to the Pre-Op Holding Area. I met with the Anesthesiologist there, who confirmed my choice of Spinal Anesthesia along with IV Sedation, and he explained to me how that would work. Once I was in the operating room and on the table, he would give me a sedative through the IV and then a needle would be placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds the spinal cord, numbing me completely from the bottom of my ribs down. I wouldn’t even know it was done. We chatted about a couple of other things and then he told me they would be ready for me in about 10 minutes. And sure enough…in about 10 minutes, they came to move me into the Operating room. I was introduced to everyone there, they slid me from my bed to the table and started doing lots of things around me. I asked if I could say a quick prayer as they kept busy and then just prayed for God to be with everyone in the room, guiding them to do their best work and preventing any problems from coming up. I also asked the Lord to be with all of the medical people and all the other patients having surgery that day as well, as it was a very busy surgical day. Once I was done, the Anesthesiologist let me know he was going to give me the sedative. I thanked everyone and told them how much I appreciated their hard work, and then off to sleep I went….

Moving on to Part 2 – Post-Op